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How long are lionhead rabbits pregnant for?

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I have some lionhead rabbits and im trying to breed them…but i dont know how long there suppose to be pregnant for….also one of my females just gave birth and she kick them out of her box…this was her first litter..and im thinking that might be why…if anyone else breeds lionheads it be great to hear from you…

You should be sure to mark down the date when your doe was bred. As the gestation period is 28 – 32 days, a nesting box should be provided to the doe about 25 or 26 days after the date she was bred. The box should be filled with a nesting material, such as straw or another material that she can use to build a nest. In most cases, the doe will also pull some of her fur to include with the nesting materials, and act as a blanket for the new born kits.
The nesting box should be about 2 – 4 inches longer and wider than the doe herself. Larger boxes may encourage her to use it as a resting place, and she may foul the box.
After you believe the doe has had her litter (if any signs indicate such), it is good to try and check the box. If she had them outside the nestbox, put them inside the box! Remember, the doe may be protective of her newly born kits, so be careful. Remove any afterbirth or dead babies from the box, as they will decay and the doe may abandon the remaining live kits due to the unpleasant smell.

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Posted on April 1st 2009 in lionhead rabbits

2 Responses to “How long are lionhead rabbits pregnant for?”

  1. kouneli Says:

    28-32 days.
    References :
    bunny care provider for 18 years, bred rabbits for 3 years

  2. okcorralmercedes Says:

    You should be sure to mark down the date when your doe was bred. As the gestation period is 28 – 32 days, a nesting box should be provided to the doe about 25 or 26 days after the date she was bred. The box should be filled with a nesting material, such as straw or another material that she can use to build a nest. In most cases, the doe will also pull some of her fur to include with the nesting materials, and act as a blanket for the new born kits.
    The nesting box should be about 2 – 4 inches longer and wider than the doe herself. Larger boxes may encourage her to use it as a resting place, and she may foul the box.
    After you believe the doe has had her litter (if any signs indicate such), it is good to try and check the box. If she had them outside the nestbox, put them inside the box! Remember, the doe may be protective of her newly born kits, so be careful. Remove any afterbirth or dead babies from the box, as they will decay and the doe may abandon the remaining live kits due to the unpleasant smell.
    References :
    Rabbit Breeder for 8 years!
    ARBA registered rabbitry

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